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CANNABIS

Although the most common way to ingest Cannabis in the USA is through the use of a bong or pipe, a large and growing number of pot users smoke joints or blunts as a primary or supplementary consumption method. In this article SSUSA takes a closer look at the papers themselves. It would seem that the bulk of any lung damage incurred through smoking joints is the fault of combustion of weed and sometimes tobacco at high temperatures, and therefore to be selective about choice of paper is pointless. However, we should always try to minimize the severity of the risk we undertake when we use Cannabis, so for this reason we should be considerate of the papers we use. Furthermore, it is surprising how much a slight difference between papers will affect the finished joint, in terms of taste, burn rate and immediate effect on the throat and chest.

Rolling papers are an integral part of every joint, and not all are created equally. There has been much evolution since the original thick, rough incarnations first appeared. The first cigarette papers were produced in 1660 by the French company Lacroix (later to become Rizla+). They had been conceived of over a century prior to this, but production was not to seriously take off until 1796, when Napoleon began to order in bulk for his overseas troops. Their 'fine' weight papers appeared in 1799, but were still quite bulky by today's standards.

“It is surprising how much a slight difference between papers will affect the finished joint"